Why Supplement

Why Getting Your Nutrition Only From Food Is A Bad Idea
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Kathy Petrillo - Why Supplement?

DO I REALLY NEED TO SUPPLEMENT?

It seems like common sense that we should all be getting enough sleep, stay hydrated, exercising, and all eating a diet rich in fruits and vegetables, but that is not the case.

 

FACTS

  • Just 1 in 10 adults meet the federal fruit or vegetable recommendations.
  • Poor Diet is associated with 1 in 5 deaths worldwide, which is equivalent to 11 million deaths a year.
  • Unhealthy eating habits are responsible for more deaths than tobacco and high blood pressure.

Reasons why we must supplement, no matter how healthy your lifestyle may be.

    • Filling that Nutritional Gap – Supplementation is intended to bridge this nutritional gap, so that we maintain the proper balance of nutrients from food and supplementation.
    • Nutrient Absorption Declines with Age – As you age, malabsorption becomes a problem because your body does not have the same ability to break down and absorb nutrients as it used to.
    • Avoid Harmful Chemicals – We have more pesticides and herbicides in our food/water that increases our need for extra vitamins and minerals = create free radicals.
    • Exercise Increases Nutrient Needs – Whether you are a competitive athlete or exercise frequently, you require more nutrients to replenish what you lose.
    • Poor Eating Habits – Poor eating habits, processed foods, and stress contribute to poor digestion, hence, need for more nutrients.
    • Soil Depletion – Our soils are depleted due to modern farming, so we have to make-up for the loss of nutrients.
    • Prevent Expensive Health Issues – Not getting enough fruits and vegetables puts you at a higher risk for diabetes, heart disease and even certain cancers.
Supplements should not replace a diet; food always comes first.The facts show 90% of Americans do not have a good diet, are not getting the fruits and vegetables required, so supplements fill the gaps, provide more nutritional insurance, improve your overall health, and helps prevent diseases.DON’T JUST SUPPLEMENT; SUPPLEMENT RIGHT!

The American Diet

 Articles highlighting changes in the American Diet.

Only 1 in 10 Adults Get Enough Fruits or Vegetables

Just 1 in 10 adults meet the federal fruit or vegetable recommendations, according to a new study published today in CDC’s Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report (MMWR). Depending on their age and sex federal guidelines recommend that adults eat at least 1½ to 2 cups per day of fruitexternal icon and 2 to 3 cups per day of vegetablesexternal icon as part of a healthy eating pattern. Yet in 2015, just 9 percent of adults met the intake recommendations for vegetables, ranging from 6 percent in West Virginia to 12 percent in Alaska. Only 12 percent of adults met the recommendations for fruit, ranging from 7 percent in West Virginia to 16 percent in Washington, D.C. Results showed that consumption was lower among men, young adults, and adults living in poverty. Read more about this >

75 Percent of Americans Say They Eat Healthy — Despite Evidence To The Contrary

We’re living at a time when more than 80 percent of Americans fail to eat the recommended amounts of fruits and vegetables. At the same time, many Americans overeat refined grains and sugar.

This may help explain why the obesity rate seems stuck. The most recent estimate is that 36 percent of adults in the U.S. are obese.

But, as a nation, we seem to have our blinders on. Despite much evidence to the contrary, most Americans say they have a healthy diet. Read more about this >

90% of US has a Poor Diet, and 25% Doesn’t Exercise

As the pandemic enters its third year with cases and hospitalizations as high as ever, fresh data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reminds us that we already had a long track record of failing to manage our health.

The latest data from a decades-long health survey finds that—yet again—the vast majority of Americans have a poor diet and many of us are inactive. Specifically, just 10 percent of Americans eat enough vegetables, and only 12 percent eat enough fruit, according to recent responses to the CDC’s survey, the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance system. Recent responses also reveal that 25 percent of Americans don’t do any exercise outside of any work activity. Read more about this >

Most Americans Don’t Eat Enough Fruits and Veggies

If you’re like most Americans, you aren’t eating enough fruits and vegetables, according to the CDC. A study published in the CDC’s Nov. 17, 2017, Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report shows only about one in 10 adults meets federal recommendations, which call for most women to eat 1.5 cups of fruit and between 2 and 2.5 cups of vegetables each day. Read more about this >

Unhealthy Diets Now Kill More People Than Tobacco and High Blood Pressure, Study Finds

If you’re like most Americans, you aren’t eating enough fruits and vegetables, according to the CDC. A study published in the CDC’s Nov. 17, 2017, Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report shows only about one in 10 adults meets federal recommendations, which call for most women to eat 1.5 cups of fruit and between 2 and 2.5 cups of vegetables each day. Read more about this >

Soil Depletion

The reduction in average mineral content of fruits and vegetables since 1940.

Dirt Poor: Have Fruits and Vegetables Become Less Nutritious?

Because of soil depletion, crops grown decades ago were much richer in vitamins and minerals than the varieties most of us get today. It would be overkill to say that the carrot you eat today has very little nutrition in it—especially compared to some of the other less healthy foods you likely also eat—but it is true that fruits and vegetables grown decades ago were much richer in vitamins and minerals than the varieties most of us get today.  Read more about this >

Are Today’s Fruits and Vegetables Less Nutritious? Soil Depletion and Nutrition

It is widely reported that the declining nutritional value of food is due to soil depletion. Is our modern food really significantly less nutritious? Is soil depletion the cause?

Claim: Our fruits and vegetables are less nutritious today than they were 30 to 50  years ago. Or, you have to eat ten tomatoes today to get the same nutritional value that you’d have gotten from one tomato in the 1950s. Or, modern agriculture is causing soil depletion which makes our fruits and vegetables much less nutritious. Truth: While based on a kernel of truth, these alarmist claims are unsubstantiated by any credible evidence. Let’s look at the source of these claims and then examine why they are undependable. Read more about this >

Fruits and vegetables are less nutritious than they used to be

Mounting evidence shows that many of today’s whole foods aren’t as packed with vitamins and nutrients as they were 70 years ago, potentially putting people’s health at risk.

As you gaze across the rows of brightly coloured fruits and vegetables in the produce section of the grocery store, you may not be aware that the quantity of nutrients in these crops has been declining over the past 70 years.

Mounting evidence from multiple scientific studies shows that many fruits, vegetables, and grains grown today carry less protein, calcium, phosphorus, iron, riboflavin, and vitamin C than those that were grown decades ago. Read more about this >

70 Years of Nutritional Decline: Today’s Fruits and Vegetables are Lacking in Vitamins and Minerals

The carrot you eat today is not as good for you as the carrot you ate 50 years ago. But how is that possible?

The nutritional content of vegetables and fruits has been declining in the United States for the past 70 years, according to a studies in the journal of the American College of Nutrition (ACN) and the American Journal of Agricultural Sciences (AJAS) in Washington, DC. Read more about this >

Dr. Berg

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